Poverty

  • Job posting
    Closing date: 22 July 2019

     

     

     

    Location

    125 North Main St.
    Room 1B-38
    Memphis, TN 38103
    United States
    Non-Competitive Eligibility (NCE):
    No
  • Job posting
    Closing date: 27 June 2019

    The VISTA Leader will support the 20 VISTAs in the CCUSA New Americans Program by: *Ensuring peer learning and networking in support of member responsibilities; *Developing trainings and resources (promoted to attend one outside information gathering event a month); *Assisting with grants management and ensuring compliance across program sites, and *Managing members and project staff in data collection, reporting and analysis. The VISTA Leader will also assist the project director with coordination, communication, and record keeping.

    Location

    2050 Ballenger Avenue, Suite 400
    Alexandria, VA 22314
    United States
    Non-Competitive Eligibility (NCE):
    No
  • Job posting
    Closing date: 2 June 2019

    WHO WE ARE
    The National Asian Pacific American Women’s Forum (NAPAWF) is the only national, multiissue advocacy organization in the United States with the mission to build collective power of those who identify as Asian American and Pacific Islander (AAPI) women and girls. Our primary policy areas of focus include:

    ● Reproductive Health Rights
    ● Economic Justice
    ● Immigrant Rights

    Location

    Philadelphia, PA 19104
    United States
    Non-Competitive Eligibility (NCE):
    No
  • Alumni story
    Tina L. Hayes 2012 2014 Gainesville, Florida

    I do have to mention that I am an AmeriCorps State/National Alumni. I realize that this site may only apply to VISTA Alums, however I did not want to miss out on sharing a snapshot of my experience. I served with Rebuilding Together, Inc. a nationwide nonprofit organization with a mission of "Bringing volunteers and communities together to improve the homes and lives of low-income homeowners." I served at the Gainesville, Florida affiliate. My titles were AmeriCorps State/National CapacityCorps Member, Volunteer/Project Site Coordinator for Rebuilding Together North Central Florida 2012-2014 (now that's a mouthful!). I served for 2 years, repairing and rebuilding homes for homeowners that could not afford the much-needed critical home repair that was endangering the lives of them and their families. When I completed my AmeriCorps terms, I continued to serve the organization as a permanent staff member until I relocated. I am currently serving as an AmeriCorps VISTA in Pennsylvania.

    Thanks for looking! Photography by me, Tina L Hayes. Enjoy! If I am not able to upload more than one picture, I'll try to upload more in another post if I am allowed.

  • Alumni story
    Marisa Thomas 2012 2012 Tallahassee

    After learning about AmeriCorps in 2011 and completing two terms of service through State/National, I had the opportunity to become a Summer VISTA through Florida State University's Youth Programs at the Center for Leadership and Social Change. My Summer VISTA experience included coordinating speakers and community outreach presentations for a neighborhood summer youth program. The skills, knowledge and hindsight that I learned as a team member has been very influential in how I communicate with others on a professional and personal basis. An unforgettable highlight was when I was invited to attend the White House briefing for AmeriCorps Alums at the close of my Summer VISTA term. I highly recommend to individuals who are seeking to learn more about Americorps and/or able to only fulfill a short service term to apply for a nearby Summer VISTA position!

  • Alumni story
    Summer Disson 2017 Chesapeake, VA

    Operation: Engage Norfolk

     

    My name is Summer, and I’m an Americorps VISTA serving with Heart of Compassion Partnerships in Chesapeake, VA. I recently attended my first “official” event with the organization, and it was impressive – to say the least.

    On Sunday, February 12, 2017 my organization attended the “Engage Norfolk” civic event. The event was sponsored by Norfolk Councilwoman Andria McClellan. Also in attendance was Norfolk Mayor Kenneth Cooper Alexander, as well as office representatives for Senators Kaine and Werner. Nearly 100 community organizations got involved and made the event.

    “Engage Norfolk” is an event that allowed the community organizations who were seeking volunteers, for various different project and programs, to interact and inform members of the community, who were looking to volunteer, about their organization and what they “do”. The turnout was amazing. At our table alone, between signup sheets and business cards, we had 30+ members of the community interested in volunteering to tutor the students at our urban outreach centers!

    The “Engage Norfolk” was a huge success. There are many cities surrounding with communities surrounding Norfolk that would benefit from an event like this. With this being the first year of the event, and it being such a success, there are “talks” of creating a “manual” so that other cities can host similar events with the same outcome and enthusiasm, as well as a version geared towards younger members of the community.

    To see the people of the community, my community, come out and support each other was truly an inspiration that has undoubtedly made an everlasting impact on the passion I have of ending the war on poverty. Throughout this year of service I look forward to seeing and experiencing our community come together and support each other to achieve the ultimate goal- to change the world one child, one family, one community at a time.

  • Alumni story
    Kristin Sewell 2016 2017 Eaton Co., Michigan

    I've lived in and out of poverty my entire life. This is the first time I've ever examined it analytically. Here's something I've learned about poverty.

    Poverty is violent. It is an assault on the body. People who live in poverty suffer hunger and are vulnerable to eviction and lack of housing or substandard shelter. Children living in poverty are more likely to lack weather-appropriate clothing or shoes. People who live in poverty are more frequently exposed to environmental toxins through their work and through their living conditions, like Flint, Michigan during the water crisis. People living in poverty are less able to flee natural disasters, like Hurricane Katrina, and are more likely to lose their lives (their bodies) because of it. People who live in poverty are more likely to suffer preventable and treatable diseases. They are more likely to have diabetes and heart conditions. They are more likely to die because of lack of healthcare. They are more likely to have to choose between medicine and food or shelter. They are more likely to neglect their bodies. They are more likely to live without access to healthy foods. They are more likely to be obese. They are more likely to smoke and use drugs or alcohol. They are more likely to have unplanned pregnancies. People living in poverty are subjected to people judging what they do with their bodies, how they eat, who they have sex with, and how many sex partners they have. People living in poverty become accustomed to negotiating with people feeling entitled to agency over their bodies. People who live in poverty are more likely to be victims of crime and are more likely to be incarcerated for having committed crimes, thus losing agency over their bodies to the state. Young people living in poverty are more likely to see military service as a means out of poverty, thus giving their bodies to the state to be maimed or killed as an act of national service. Children living in poverty are more likely to be abused by authority figures as they are vulnerable, easy prey, and less likely to see abuse as an outrage rather than just more violence to their small bodies. Women living in poverty are more likely to suffer relationship violence. They are more likely to stay with violent partners for much the same reason. They are more likely to experience blame, shame, and judgment for their choices even though other people who make similar choices are easily forgiven.

    Poverty is violence. Solving poverty is a moral imperative.

  • Alumni story
    David den Boer 2014 2016 Mesa, Arizona (Phoenix)

    I served two full VISTA terms with the Native American Fatherhood and Families Association in Mesa, Arizona.  I was able to venture onto multiple reservations during my stay and meet with native elders of several tribes.  Seeing first hand the level of poverty right in the backyard of many residents of the Phoenix Metro area raised my level of concern on how indigenous people were being treated right here at home.  I grew to understand the level of distrust between natives and non natives with the hopes of revisiting the population in the future as it is an area that needs a lot of work and care put into it.

  • Video
    Explore lessons about poverty learned during the first 50 years of the VISTA program, in this compelling explanation by Dr. Stephen Pimpare, author of A People's History of Poverty in America.
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  • Webpage link

    Dive deeper into income and poverty statistics for the U.S. with these reports prepared by the U.S. Census Bureau.

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